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ARP-Esser

Accessibility 

 

  • Accessibility (Instructions on what to do if you or someone you know needs an accommodation with this plan) 
  • Upon request and the extent practicable, the district will provide the plan in a language parents can understand or, if not practicable, will have it orally translated, 
  • Upon request by a parent who is an individual with a disability, the district will provide the plan in an alternative format accessible to the parent
  • If you need any of the above accommodations please reach out to Rhonda Banks at 606.784.8928

Section 1: The extent to which and how funds will be used to implement prevention and mitigation strategies consistent with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance on reopening schools.

Narrative:

Rowan County Schools is committed to staff and student health and safety as we return to in-person and hybrid learning post pandemic. To continue to mitigate the effects and reduce the spread of COVID-19, we will utilize funds to implement the practices and protocols listed below.  Furthermore, we will continually monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of each of these practices, and we will adjust as needed to follow any updated guidance in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control, the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, and the Kentucky Department of Education and local Health Department.

Prevention and Mitigation Strategies

●      Physical distancing

●      Personal Protective Equipment

●      Handwashing and respiratory/cough etiquette

●      Cleaning and maintaining healthy facilities

●      Additional staff for on-going cleaning during the school day and sanitization during non-instructional hours

●      Improving ventilation systems or purchase new ventilation systems

●      Continue to collaborate with the state and local health department regarding contact tracing in combination with isolation and quarantine strategies.

●      Additional staff including nurses to check temperatures and supervise isolated students

●      Diagnostic and screening testing

●      Staff to complete temperature checks and ensure physical distancing in buildings, buses and events

●      Provide vaccinations to educators, other staff, students, and families if eligible

●      Provide appropriate accommodations for children with disabilities with respect to the health and safety policies

●      Water bottle refill stations 

●      Backpacks for students to eliminate the need to visit lockers and allow for social distance

●      1:1 Technology devices

●      Signage and printed communication of health and safety protocols in multiple languages

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 2: How the local education agency (LEA) will use funds to address the academic impact of lost instructional time through the implementation of evidence-based interventions.

Narrative:

Section 2 of this American Rescue Plan is focused on how Rowan County Schools will utilize funds to address the academic impact of lost instructional time through evidence-based interventions. The plans below detail the areas of focus Rowan County Schools will intentionally address to mitigate the impact of lost instructional time, the evidence-based interventions we will utilize to do so, the research citations and links for those evidence-based interventions, as well as a rationale explaining how our district will implement each evidence-based intervention.

Area of Focus

Evidence-Based Intervention

Research

Implementation Rationale

Instruction

Professional Learning Communities

Hamilton, L., Halverson, R., Jackson, S., Mandinach, E., Supovitz, J., & Wayman, J. (2009). Using student achievement data to support instructional decision making (NCEE 2009-4067). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.

https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/dddm_pg_092909.pdf

 

DuFour, R., & DuFour, R. (2012). The school leader’s guide to professional learning communities at work. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press. Learning by Doing (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, & Many, 2010; DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, & Mattos, 2016 [in press])—a focus on learning, a culture of collaboration, and a focus on results.

PLCs will be used at the school and district level as an evidence-based intervention that ensures a focus on student learning and building a collaborative culture that is results driven.  This practice will promote equity for students.  Analysis of classroom level data will drive teacher reflection of their instructional practices.  Implementation strategies include continued training on the PLC process and School Improvement Planning for Performance Excellence.

Formative Assessment

Black, P., & William, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 92, 81 -90. http://weaeducation.typepad.co.uk/files/blackbox-1.pdf

 

Formative assessment will be used as an evidence-based intervention specifically focused on learning loss that provides on-going information regarding student progress towards a measurable academic goal. Some implementation strategies include on-going training during grade level district PLCs on strategies to use before, during, and after a lesson that provide information on student progress and to inform teaching and learning.  Teacher representatives and Success Coaches across the district  will work together to create common formative assessments. Analysis of these assessments will occur in grade level school PLCs.

Student Engagement Strategies

Fredricks, J., McColskey, W., Meli, J., Mordica, J., Montrosse, B., and Mooney, K. (2011). Measuring student engagement in upper elementary through high school: a description of 21 instruments. (Issues & Answers Report, REL 2011–No. 098). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast. https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/southeast/pdf/rel_2011098.pdf

Haydon T., Macsuga-Gage A.S., Simonsen B., Hawkins R. Opportunities to respond: A key component of effective instruction. Beyond Behavior. 2012;22(1):23-31. doi:10.1177/107429561202200105

 

Macsuga-Gage A.S., Simonsen B., Briere D.E. Effective teaching practices: Effective teaching practices that promote a positive classroom environment. Beyond Behavior. 2012;22(1):14-22. doi:10.1177/107429561202200104

 

Marion, S., Thompson, J., Evans, C., Martineau, J., and Dadey, N. (2019). A tricky balance: The challenges and opportunities of balanced systems of assessments. Presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education. Toronto, Canada. https://www.nciea.org/sites/default/files/publications/A%20Tricky%20Balance_031319.pdf

Martin, B., Sargent, K., Van Camp, A., & Wright, J. (2018). Practice Guide: Increasing opportunities to respond as an intensive intervention. Washington, DC: US Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED591076.pdf

Student engagement strategies will be used as an evidence-based intervention to provide meaningful student involvement in classroom learning and address learning loss. Strategies such as accountable talk, choral responding, opportunities to respond, questioning strategies, wait time, guided notes, graphic organizers, use of visuals, student goal-setting, etc. increase student investment in their own learning and are linked to greater student achievement.  Some implementation strategies include training for teachers on multiple engagement strategies and feedback on how these strategies are being implemented in their classrooms.

 

Data Systems

Hamilton, L., Halverson, R., Jackson, S., Mandinach, E., Supovitz, J., & Wayman, J. (2009). Using student achievement data to support instructional decision making (NCEE 2009-4067). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.

https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/dddm_pg_092909.pdf

 

Kekahio, W., & Baker, M. (2013). Five steps for structuring data-informed conversations and action in education. (REL 2013–001). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific. https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/pacific/pdf/REL_2013001.pdf

 

Data systems will be used as an evidence-based intervention to gather and report data and to use data-based decision making to generate a strategic action plan that addresses learning loss.  The data system provides the framework upon which data teams look for patterns and make observations about the data.  The analysis of academic and behavioral data informs instructional practices and provides a data team with insight into what strategies (both behavioral and instructional) are working well and which need to be reconsidered.  Some implementation strategies include creating a data housing system and teacher training on how to utilize the data system to inform instruction.

 

Culturally Responsive Teaching

Byrd, C. M. (2016). Does Culturally Relevant teaching work? An examination from student perspectives. SAGE Open, 6(3), 1-10. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2158244016660744

 

Gay, G. (2010). Culturally Responsive Teaching : theory, research, and practice (2nd ed.). Teachers College.

 

Moore, A, L., Giles, R. M., & Vitulli, P. (2021) "Prepared to Respond? Investigating preservice teachers’ perceptions of their readiness for Culturally Responsive Teaching," International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Vol. 15: No. 1, Article 10. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2072&context=ij-sotl

 

Piazza, S. V., Rao, S., & Protacio, M. S. (2015). Converging recommendations for culturally responsive literacy practices: Students with learning disabilities, English language learners, and socioculturally diverse learners. International Journal of Multicultural Education, 17(3), 1-20. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1104910

 

Culturally Responsive Teaching will be used as an evidence-based intervention to narrow achievement gaps and to provide student-centered and authentic instruction that is inclusive, scaffolds student learning, and provides a challenging curriculum in a respectful climate.  Culturally relevant teachers take personal responsibility for the success of all students and create connections between classroom content and students’ background knowledge while taking into account students’ cultural identities and the assets those identities bring to the classroom.  Some implementation strategies include stipends for  training of all teachers and staff on cultural competence and culturally responsive teaching, staff book studies about culturally responsive teaching,  high quality instructional materials that are actively engaging, student centered, culturally inclusive, and high quality student materials such the purchasing of class sets of texts and educational materials that are inclusive of student cultures and languages.

Multi-Tiered Systems of Support

Arden, S. V., Gandhi, A. G., Zumeta Edmonds, R., & Danielson, L. (2017). Toward more effective tiered systems: Lessons from national implementation efforts. Exceptional Children, 83(3), 269–280. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1146326.

Freeman, J., Sugai, G., Simonsen, B., & Everett, S. (2017). MTSS coaching: Bridging knowing to doing. Theory Into Practice, 56(1), 29–37. DOI: 10.1080/00405841.2016.1241946

Jimerson, S. R., Burns, M. K., & VanDerHeyden, A. M. (2016). From response to intervention to multi-tiered systems of support: Advances in the science and practice of assessment and intervention. In S. R. Jimerson, M. K. Burns, & A. M. VanDerHeyden (Eds.), Handbook of Response to Intervention: The science and practice of multi-tiered systems of support (2nd ed.) (pp. 1–6). New York, NY: Springer.

McIntosh, K., & Goodman, S. (2016). Integrated multi-tiered systems of support: Blending RTI and PBIS. New York, NY: Guilford Press

National Center on Response to Intervention at the American Institutes for Research. (2015). MTSS, RTI, special education … Oh my! Gaining an understanding of MTSS and RTI from Drs. Lynn Fuchs and Joe Jenkins. Washington, DC: Author. https://rti4success.org/video/mtss-rti-special-education%E2%80%A6oh-my -gaining-understanding-mtss-and-rti-drs-lynn-fuchs-and-joe.

Scott, T.M., Gage, N.A., Hirn, R.G., Shearer Lingo, A., & Burt, J. (2019) An examination of the association between MTSS implementation fidelity measures and student outcomes, Preventing School Failure: Alternative Education for Children and Youth, 63:4, 308-316, DOI: 10.1080/1045988X.2019.1605971

Multi-Tiered Systems of Support will be used as an evidence-based framework to give universal, supplemental and targeted support to all students.  The four components of MTSS include universal screening, data-based decision making, multi-level prevention systems, and progress monitoring. All components make up an effective MTSS framework which allows districts and schools to provide core differentiated instruction and intervention in a timely manner to support students' learning loss.

Some implementation strategies include training on the MTSS Framework, registration for staff to attend training on effective intervention strategies and effective ways to monitor progress. 

Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

Freeman, J., Simonsen, B., McCoach, D. B., Sugai, G., Lombardi, A., & Horner, R. (2017). Relationship Between School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports and Academic, Attendance, and Behavior Outcomes in High Schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 18(1), 41-51. DOI:10.1177/1098300715580992

Horner, R.H., Sugai, G. & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the Evidence Base for School-Wide Positive Behavior Support. Focus on Exceptional Children. 42. 1-14. 10.17161/fec.v42i8.6906.

 

OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (October 2015). Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Implementation Blueprint: Part 1 – Foundations and Supporting Information. Eugene, OR: University of Oregon. https://www.pbis.org/resource/pbis-implementation-blueprint

 

Scott, T.M., Gage, N. An Examination of the Association Between Teacher’s Instructional Practices and School-Wide Disciplinary and Academic Outcomes. Educ. Treat. Child. 43, 223–235 (2020). DOI: 10.1080/1045988X.2019.1605971

 

Simonsen, B., & Myers, D. (2015). Classwide positive behavior interventions and supports: A guide to proactive classroom management. Guilford Press.

Sugai, G., Horner, R. H. (2015). School-wide PBIS: An Example of Applied Behavior Analysis Implemented at a Scale of Social Importance. Behavior Analysis Practice. Feb2015. DOI: 10.1007/s40617-015-0045-4.

US Department of Justice and US Department of Education, (July, 2014). Dear colleague letter on the nondiscriminatory administration of school discipline. https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-201401-title-vi.html

U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, (March, 2014). Civil rights data collection: Data snapshot (School Discipline). https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/crdc-college-and-career-readiness-snapshot.pdf

Walker, H. M., Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., Bullis, M., Sprague, J. R., Bricker, D., & Kaufman, M. J. (1996). Integrated approaches to preventing antisocial behavior patterns among school-age children and youth. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 4, 193-256. https://doi.org/10.1177/106342669600400401

PBIS will be used as an evidence-based intervention to develop school-wide expectations, targeted interventions and supports, and data-driven decisions to improve student behavior and student outcomes. Some implementation strategies include training for teachers to develop expectations, interventions, and support.  Funding for PBIS coach(es) at the district or building level are also possible implementation strategies. 

ELA

High Quality Instruction and  Materials

Kamil, M. L., Borman, G. D., Dole, J., Kral, C. C., Salinger, T., and Torgesen, J. (2008). Improving adolescent literacy: Effective classroom and intervention practices: A Practice Guide (NCEE #2008-4027). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/adlit_pg_082608.pdf

The use of high quality instruction and materials will be used as an evidence-based intervention to explicitly teach vocabulary, to provide direct and explicit instruction on comprehension strategies, and to provide opportunities for extensive study of the meaning and interpretation of a text.  Possible implementation strategies include training on various vocabulary strategies, training on highest effect size comprehension strategies for elementary and secondary students, investment and training in guided reading as well as implementing leveled texts into instruction.

Teaching Essential Skills

Foorman, B., Beyler, N., Borradaile, K., Coyne, M., Denton, C. A., Dimino, J., Furgeson, J., Hayes, L., Henke, J., Justice, L., Keating, B., Lewis, W., Sattar, S., Streke, A., Wagner, R., & Wissel, S. (2016). Foundational skills to support reading for understanding in kindergarten through 3rd grade (NCEE 2016-4008). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEE), Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/practiceguide/wwc_found_reading_summary_051517.pdf

 

Shanahan, T., Callison, K., Carriere, C., Duke, N. K., Pearson, P. D., Schatschneider, C., & Torgesen, J. (2010). Improving reading comprehension in kindergarten through 3rd grade: A practice guide (NCEE 2010-4038). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.

https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/readingcomp_pg_092810.pdf

Prioritizing essential skills and standards will be used as an evidence-based intervention that helps teachers provide targeted support for the most important content.  Teachers will work together in district and school PLCS  to determine essential standards that will receive the most instructional time, will be frequently revisited, and taught to mastery.  All required standards will be taught but essential standards will receive the most focus.  Implementation strategies include training on the standards, time for teachers to collaborate before each instructional unit to revise the pacing as needed, and teacher stipends to complete this work and to collaborate on effective instructional strategies to teach standards.

Math

High Quality Instruction and Materials

Gersten, R., Beckmann, S., Clarke, B., Foegen, A., Marsh, L., Star, J. R., & Witzel, B. (2009). Assisting students struggling with mathematics: Response to Intervention (RtI) for elementary and middle schools (NCEE 2009-4060). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/rti_math_pg_042109.pdf

 

The use of high-quality instruction and materials will be used as an evidence-based intervention to explicitly teach mathematical concepts and problem solving, to use visual representations and models of mathematical ideas during explicit instruction, and to increase fluency of basic facts.  Some implementation strategies include training on mathematical practices, how to use manipulative materials to foster conceptual understanding, and training on the use of number talks to increase fluency and number sense. Other implementation strategies will be to  provide K-12 teachers with materials, initial and follow up training on evidence based researched materials.  

Prioritizing Essential Standards

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (June 2020).  Moving Forward:  Mathematics Learning in the Era of COVID-19. https://www.mathedleadership.org/mathematics-learning-in-the-era-of-covid-19/

 

Prioritizing essential skills and standards will be used

as an evidence-based intervention that helps teachers provide targeted support for the most important content.  Teachers will work together in grade level and district PLCs to determine essential standards that will receive the most instructional time, will be frequently revisited, and taught to mastery.  Implementation strategies include training on power standards, time for teachers to collaborate in PLCs before each instructional unit to revise the pacing as needed.

 

 

 

Section 3: How the LEA will spend the remainder of its funds.

Narrative:

Because Rowan County Schools is committed to staff and student health and safety as we return to in-person and hybrid learning post pandemic, we will be utilizing remaining funds to provide needed facility updates which are directly tied to reducing overcrowding and poor indoor air quality.  Facility upgrades will include the addition of up to four classrooms to increase distancing in classrooms where overcrowding has occurred; install a new HVAC system in an elementary school that has persistent issues with poor indoor air quality including excessive humidity; and install a new roof in the high school to help mitigate issues with leaks which create poor indoor air quality. 

 

United States Environmental Protection Agency: Reference Guide for Indoor Air Quality in Schools https://www.epa.gov/iaq-schools/reference-guide-indoor-air-quality-schools

 

United States Environmental Protection Agency: Creating Healthy Indoor Air Quality  https://www.epa.gov/iaq-schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 4: How the LEA will ensure that interventions address the academic impact of lost instructional time and respond to the academic, social, emotional and mental health needs of all students.

 

Narrative:

Section 4 of this ARP details how we are responding to the academic, social, emotional, and mental health needs of all students and how we will ensure the selected interventions address the academic impact of lost instructional time. This section also addresses how Rowan County Schools conducted meaningful consultation with required stakeholders and utilized feedback when creating our district plan.

 

Area of Focus

Evidence-Based Intervention

Research

 

Implementation Rationale

 

Mental Health Wellness & Social Emotional Learning

 

 

 

 

Trauma Informed Schools

Courtney Wiest-Stevenson & Cindy Lee (2016) Trauma-Informed Schools, Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work, 13:5, 498-503, DOI: 10.1080/23761407.2016.1166855

 

Longhi, D. (2015). Higher resilience and school performance among students with disproportionately high adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) at Lincoln High, in Walla Walla, Washington, 2009 to 2013. Olympia, WA: Participatory Research Consulting, LLC. https://www.pacesconnection.com/fileSendAction/fcType/0/fcOid/466307103279770868/filePointer/466307103281285022/fodoid/466307103281285018/LH%20report%20final%20%281%29.pdf

 

Missouri Department of Health. (2019). The Missouri Model:  A developmental framework for trauma informed approaches. MO Dept. of Mental Health and Partners. https://dmh.mo.gov/media/pdf/missouri-model-developmental-framework-trauma-informed-approaches

 

Pynoos, R. S, Fairbank, J. A., Steinberg, A. M., Amaya-Jackson, L., Gerrity, E., Mount, M. L., & Maze, J. (2008). The National Child Traumatic Stress Network: Collaborating to improve the standard of care. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 39(4), 389–395. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012551

Substance abuse and mental health services administration. (2014). SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach. HHS Publication No. (SMA) 14-4884. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. https://ncsacw.samhsa.gov/userfiles/files/SAMHSA_Trauma.pdf

Trauma Sensitive Schools Training Package. (2021). National Center on Safe and Supportive Learning Environments. https://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov/trauma-sensitive-schools-training-package

Creating trauma informed and trauma sensitive schools will be an area of focus for Rowan County Schools. The district will utilize Trauma Informed Teams at the district and building level to build capacity to effectively and efficiently respond to student trauma within the district. Training modules will be rolled out district wide in school google classrooms  and  reviewed in staff meetings and/or PLCs.

 

The district SEL coach will work with each school to support teacher and staffs understanding of trauma and identify strategies that can be used to support students.

 

School Resource Officers

James, R. K., Logan, J., & Davis, S. A. (2011). Including School Resource Officers in school-based crisis intervention: Strengthening student support. School Psychology International, 32(2), 210–224. https://doi.org/10.1177/0143034311400828

The district will collaborate with local law enforcement agencies to provide a school resource office to service each school in the district. KRS 158.4414-.4415

 

Staff Wellness

Lever, N., Mathis, E., & Mayworm, A. (2015). School mental health is not just for students. Why teacher and school staff wellness matters. Report on Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Youth, 17(1), 6–12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350815/

The following plan implements evidence-based interventions to address the mental health needs of staff working in schools.

The district will provide health screenings, and create programs to incentivize healthy life choices.

 

 

Social Emotional Programming

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://pg.casel.org/review-programs/

 

The district will train all staff Pre K- 12 on Social Emotional Competencies. The district will also provide training on best practices as grade level district wide teams work to incorporate SEL into each content area to maximize student and teacher proficiency of social emotional competencies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Stakeholder Input:

Rowan County Schools recognizes the importance of stakeholder feedback and input as students, teachers, administrators, families, community agencies, and local businesses begin to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. Prior to Rowan County Schools creating a recovery plan, stakeholder feedback was solicited in multiple ways.

 

Stakeholder surveys were sent via email, text, social media platforms and posted to school/district web pages so that the following groups had an opportunity to give feedback:

  1. students enrolled
  2. parents/guardians of students enrolled
  3. school district employees
  4. community members/leaders

 

In addition to surveys, stakeholder groups were given opportunities to engage in meaningful, two-way conversations where their feedback was sought.  Focus groups were:

  1. Rowan County Board of Education - district, school and parent groups
  2. School Based Decision-Making Councils- parent representatives and school employees (which include representatives of historically disadvantaged groups of child)
  3. School and District Leadership- District Leadership, Program Directors, School Principals/Counselors, District/School Success Coaches
  4. District Trauma Informed Team
  5. Rowan County Education Association (RCEA) Teacher Group
  6. KBE Ex Officio Member Allison Slone
  7. Local and County Agencies (e.g., Morehead State University, Mayor’s office, Rowan County Health Department, Rowan County Judge Executive, Rowan County Sheriff’s Office) 

The Rowan County community, as a whole, includes stakeholders groups, listed above, representing historically disadvantaged groups of children. In a collaborative effort to determine the most effective and efficient way to utilize personnel, resources, and allocate funding the above groups reviewed and analyzed feedback that was given.  Based on the feedback Rowan County Schools created our American Rescue Plan. 

 

 

 

 

Budget Proposal

Narrative:

In the budget proposal below, Rowan County Schools will utilize all ARP ESSER funds according to the areas indicated in the above documentation.  

 

2021-22

2022-23

2023-24

Total

Virtual Teachers to support implementation of all areas of Section 2

$100,000

$100,000

$0

$200,000

Viking Success Summer Learning Program targeting academic loss in section 2.

$350,000

$350,000

$263,788

$963,788

Technology Upgrades to support Section 2  as well as times when virtual learning may be required

$300,000

$522,815

$16,500

$839,015

Construction Projects to support Section 3

0

$5,200,000

0

$5,200,000

Instructional materials to support Section 2

$250,000

$250,000

$136,212

$636,212

Total ARP ESSER allocation

 

 

 

$7,839,015