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Rowan County Schools cancels classes August 21st for solar eclipse

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Timeline of Solar Eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, much of Kentucky will be experiencing what could be a once-in-a-lifetime event – a total solar eclipse.  The members of the Rowan County School Board, Superintendent Marvin Moore, and the principals of the elementary, middle and high schools unanimously agreed that it was in the best interest of the students to cancel classes on Monday, August 21, 2017.  

 

With the peak time of the eclipse occurring at approximately 2:32 PM, just as buses are lining up at schools to pick up students, and ending at approximately 4 PM, the safety of the students is of primary concern.  Having the day off will also provide parents and students a joint learning opportunity.

 

“This will be a wonderful learning opportunity for our students.  At the schools, our teachers have already prepared lessons to give our students a better understanding of the solar eclipse and its historic and scientific implications,” said Supt. Moore.    “There are also opportunities locally and on the Internet for parents and students to learn about the eclipse together.”

 

Morehead State University’s Star Theatre at the Space Science Center will be hosting special presentations titled “Totality” about the solar eclipse. The programs will be held Monday through Friday, August 14-18, 2017, at 6 PM and 7 PM and will include question and answer sessions following the Monday through Thursday presentations.  

 

Students and parents can learn about the solar eclipse by going to https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/ or https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/Gallery/suneclipse2017.html.  These websites give important scientific and safety information as well as offering a map of the areas that will be affected by the solar eclipse.  Weather permitting, Rowan County may experience just over 90% totality while an area near Hopkinsville, Kentucky, in the western part of the state, has been identified as the point of the greatest eclipse.

 

 





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